Philosophically interrogating cultural issues, at this time of seismic cultural and political change, provides an antidote to polarised simplistic thinking in our own echo chambers. Our content encourages ‘The Art of Thinking’ with empathy, clarity and courage.

We reserve the right to not always agree with the content we publish. It is important to encounter ideas that challenge viewpoints and are thought provoking.  We publish ideas that are free-standing, and not embedded in pre-existing academic theory.

We will not publish pieces embedded in, or involving prejudices against individuals merely by virtue of particular demographic groups they belong to. We encourage people to be treated as individuals, judged by the content of their character, beliefs, and actions. We may not agree with them, but regardless of whether we do, we support their right to dissent, and ability to retain the same rights as everybody else.

To be treated as individuals means being open to questioning and critique. Reasonable questioning or disagreement is not bigotted. Many get offended if their beliefs are questioned. Today, to challenge some sacred beliefs means you may have to run the gauntlet of personal attacks and abuse for daring to query some explanations. Certain reasonable questioning can therefore become censored. Many are scared to say what they really think. This leads to a kind of authoritarian protection of particular viewpoints, for potentially bad reasons. This is why we are passionate about free speech. To this end we may publish potentially controversial ideas from all over the political spectrum to scrutinise and debate. Controversial ideas that challenge the mainstream are there to be engaged with. Certain ways of thinking are always open to questioning. They are not there to automatically be accepted.

Join-in and engage with the essays by adding comments containing any interesting rebuttals and nuanced interrogation you chose. NB. Personal insults and bigoted attitudes will not get on the page. We are not the twittersphere or the Houses of Parliament. We do live in a pluralistic society after all.